salon secrets


Beauty, Stronger Than Illness

June 7th 2016
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Cancer affected the lives of 385,000 people in France in 2015. The body suffers and changes when it’s battling illness, and our priorities do too. However, feeling dignified, not being afraid of other people looking at you, and taking care of yourself can help us deal with illness. Free from taboos and each in her own way, Charlotte Husson and Marta Bassols have decided to help people suffering from cancer with their beauty routines.

The K fighting Kit, Beauty Kits You Can Use At Home

Charlotte Husson is 30 years old. She’s a Parisian, a stylist, an illustrator, and so much more besides. Ever since entering remission in 2014, Charlotte decided to launch her own blog. Because although it’s impossible to control everything when you’re ill, ‘what you can manage is the image you give of yourself. Your beauty, and your dignity, they’re fundamental in fighting illness,’ she tells us proudly.

Charlotte Husson blogger of Mister K Fighting Kit
Charlotte Husson blogger of Mister K Fighting Kit

Determined to not change too much, Charlotte continued to look after herself. She adapted her routines to the changes that her anti-‘K’ treatments were putting her body through, and these days she shares her advice and tips on her Mister K fighting kit blog.

In response to the support she received from other ‘K Fighters’, and because there are so many people who are helpless when faced with this sort of turn of events, Charlotte has developed 4 different beauty kits – feet and hands, hair and eyebrows, face and body, and a kit for men – that aim to simplify the day to day lives of people living with illness. Each of these kits is made up of specialised products and tutorials which will help you learn to look after yourself, whatever treatments you might be going through.

The K fighting Kit, Beauty Kits You Can Use At Home
Photo credits: Mister K Fighting Kit

La Tulaxula: Learning To Look After Your Wig

The La Tulaxula salon in Barcelona specialises in hairpieces. Once a month, Marta Bassols, who sells high quality wigs, organises a free workshop to teach people how to take care of their wig and their delicate scalp.

The La Tulaxula salon
Photo credits: The La Tulaxula salon

She believes in this sort of teaching because of the need to inform and help vulnerable people, and as such she works with Barcelona’s largest medical centres, as well as with the Oncolliga association which collects wigs in order to then offer them to people with low incomes.

Marta, who learnt how to make wigs whilst working for different, celebrated Spanish theatre companies, also works to keep them looking young. Here is some of her advice: ‘Whatever wig you have, I recommend that you never wash it in between your hands and fingers. It’s better to use the mould on which it normally rests because that will prevent the hair from going back inside the netting. You shouldn’t wash it too often either, once a month is enough.

The La Tulaxula salon
Photo credits: The La Tulaxula salon

If you opt for a synthetic wig, choose a style that stops above the shoulders. Since synthetic fibres are not very resistant to rubbing, this style will make sure your wig’s tips are not ruined. Never expose it to a heat source – such as a blowdryer, straightening iron or hot water. Finally, you should also apply a specialised hydrating mask for thirty minutes after washing to give it back its softness.

If your wig is made from natural hair, the style can be long because it won’t fray, but in practical terms i’d still recommend going with a shorter cut. To wash it, although it’s made from natural fibres, standard cosmetic products are of no use, you really have to use specific treatments. Again, apply a mask after shampooing.’

Bringing the art of wig care to within everybody’s reach, above all that means helping people who want to fight against their illness with two formidable weapons: beauty and self-esteem.